Search
 
 

Display results as :
 


Rechercher Advanced Search

Latest topics
» Hello :)
by Mumra Today at 2:15 pm

» The Smith-Muntd Modernization Act 2012
by Awoken2 Today at 2:08 pm

» Buteyko Breathing
by toolapcblack Today at 1:46 pm

» Letter Process / Debt transfer to new company
by Winston Today at 12:56 pm

» ...Is this the final straw?
by ceylon Today at 12:53 pm

» Can stage 4 cancer be cured naturally?
by ceylon Today at 12:53 pm

» No wet signature
by eargoggles Today at 11:36 am

» A tale of three Magis
by El E Mentary Today at 9:35 am

» Help required with CCJ defence
by Ausk Today at 7:47 am

» Predictive programming and the music industry.
by Awoken2 Yesterday at 11:58 pm

» NIP
by Tom Bombadil Yesterday at 10:10 pm

» fine at old address.
by Tom Bombadil Yesterday at 10:01 pm

» UK Column
by ceylon Yesterday at 8:06 pm

» Is no news good news?
by ceylon Yesterday at 6:10 pm

» Cbd Oil
by Lawful rebel Yesterday at 3:47 pm

» Court Scam
by El E Mentary Yesterday at 8:31 am

» Let's Have Some Tunes thread.
by Awoken2 Wed Feb 21, 2018 11:17 pm

» Reality chat with peter howard and company
by Society of the Spectacle Wed Feb 21, 2018 7:40 pm

» Hello and a little help please for loan debt
by homerishome Wed Feb 21, 2018 5:29 pm

» Did Robin Hood Loose £7 6 MILLION in it's second year That's OK YOU can PAY
by ceylon Wed Feb 21, 2018 4:08 pm

» Florida School Shooting - TWO Shooters..?
by Awoken2 Wed Feb 21, 2018 3:17 pm

» ...Is that the perfect royal shit?
by Lopsum Wed Feb 21, 2018 2:46 pm

» Any advice - STA international - Student Loan - OUSBA
by Tiggy Wed Feb 21, 2018 1:09 pm

» The Supreme Court throws out an appeal by Scotland Yard.
by midnight Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:35 am

» Homeless
by Tom Bombadil Tue Feb 20, 2018 9:00 pm

» Latest from CrimeBodge
by assassin Tue Feb 20, 2018 7:20 pm

» The KaK & M@C Show Do NOTTINGHAM CITY COUNCIL
by ceylon Tue Feb 20, 2018 7:02 pm

» Dealing With Corrupt Po=lice
by assassin Tue Feb 20, 2018 6:59 pm

» RBS admits forging customer signature
by El E Mentary Tue Feb 20, 2018 12:24 pm

» ...Fancy paying for another parasite? Is KFC closed?
by ceylon Tue Feb 20, 2018 12:07 pm

» ho'oponopono
by Tvarred Tue Feb 20, 2018 12:01 pm

» The 7 Principles of Hermes ( Tehuti)
by urchinatheart Tue Feb 20, 2018 8:39 am

» ...Hippocratic of the royals
by ceylon Mon Feb 19, 2018 8:50 pm

» sol excalibre with cookiemonster
by Society of the Spectacle Mon Feb 19, 2018 7:38 pm

» Long time lurker
by assassin Mon Feb 19, 2018 6:13 pm

» Are you a pauper ?
by LionsShare Mon Feb 19, 2018 5:31 pm

» 24Studio Catalogue Debt - Need Some Advice Please
by actinglikeabanker Mon Feb 19, 2018 12:15 pm

Moon phases


What does advertising do?

Go down

What does advertising do?

Post by actinglikeabanker on Sun Feb 11, 2018 1:39 pm

What does advertising do?
When you don't pay attention to ads, they affect you.

Posted Aug 31, 2010

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/ulterior-motives/201008/what-does-advertising-do

Art Markman, Ph.D. wrote: We live in a world of advertising. It is a world of our making, of course. We don't like to pay the full price of things, so we allow other people to pay part of that price in exchange for letting them pass a message to us. So, we open up the pages of our favorite magazine, and there are glossy ads for clothes, shoes, cars, or beer. We turn on the television, and smiling faces on television try to sell us soup, toothpaste, candy, and politicians.

The reason that we accept all this advertising is that we assume that we can tune most of it out. If we don't pay attention to the ads, then they won't have that much of an affect on our behavior. Sure, the makers of commercials can try to jack up the volume, but at least we have the right to look away.

Right?

A paper slated to appear in the December, 2010 issue of the Journal of Consumer Research by Melanie Dempsey and Andrew Mitchell suggests that the picture might not be so rosy. These researchers did two clever studies that ought to make us think twice about how much advertising we allow ourselves to be exposed to.

We usually assume that advertising functions mostly to tell us about the properties of a product. A particular detergent might advertise that it gets stains out better than competitors, that it smells good, and that it leaves clothes feeling fresh. We believe that these properties are ones that will help us to choose the detergent we want to buy.

However, ads also do other things. One thing they do is to take a product and to put it next to lots of other things that we already feel positively about. For example, an ad for detergent may have fresh flowers, cute babies, and sunshine in it. All of these things are ones that we probably feel pretty good about already. And repeatedly showing the detergent along with other things that we feel good about can make us feel good about the detergent, too. This transfer of our feelings from one set of items to another is called affective conditioning (the word affect means feelings).

In these studies, Dempsey and Mitchell told people about two brands of pens. One brand had better properties than the other. So, objectively, that better brand is the one people should have picked. Before making a choice about the pens, though, some people did what they thought was an unrelated experiment in which they watched pictures on a screen that flashed quickly. Some of these pictures paired the brand name of the pen that had the worse set of properties with a lot of positive items. This procedure is known to create affective conditioning.

So, this experiment put two sources of information in opposition. People had a set of properties about the pens that suggested one brand was better than the other. And the group that did not go through the affective conditioning procedure picked this brand most of the time when asked to choose a pen.

The people who went through the affective conditioning procedure picked the pen that was paired with positive items 70-80% of the time. They chose this pen, even though they had information that the other pen was better. Over the two studies in this paper, the authors found that people chose the pen that was paired with positive objects even when people were given as much time as they wanted to make a choice, and even when the instructions specifically encouraged them to pick the best choice and to say why they were choosing a particular pen.

These results suggest that the most powerful effect of advertising is just to create a good feeling about a product by surrounding it with other things that you like. It is also important to point out that affective conditioning is most effective when you don't realize that it is happening. That is, trying to pay less attention to the ads you see on TV and in magazines may actually make this type of advertising more effective.

So, why do we choose things just because we feel good about them? The world is a busy place. It is hard for us to feel confident that we have all of the objective facts about anything, whether it is products, people, or choices of things to do. The feelings we have are often a good marker of what is safe to do and what is likely to turn out well. If we have to make a choice, and one of the options just feels good to us, then we are likely to go with the one that feels good.

Most of the time, of course, that is a good idea. Often, we feel good about something because we have had positive experiences with it in the past. The problem is that we allow advertisers to have access to our mental world. They have paid for the opportunity to slip information to us about what feels good. That information ultimately affects the way we make choices, whether we know it or not.
avatar
actinglikeabanker
Not so newb
Not so newb

Posts : 508
Join date : 2017-05-10

Back to top Go down

Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum